Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 1

Our first creation in 3D will be an animation asset, a pirate themed treasure chest. We will be exercising creative control in the aesthetic style of the asset and modelling the asset in 3DsMax (AutoDesk Inc, 2016) .

I begin the research stage and start to think about design decisions. We may choose to follow an example of a pirate chest we find that exists in real life or sketch our own. We can also choose a mix of the two for our own desired effect.

I have chosen to start with a real life example, making small changes and tweaks as I model till I am satisfied.

After this design stage we began to construct the beginnings of our model from a simple primitive, a box, which we can then alter to fit the dimensions we need. The axis also comes into play from the beginning of any modelling and it is a concept which by itself was easy to understand. It is later when navigating the 3DsMax space and manipulating the model that the grid and axis was a little tricky to understand. It was explained in further detail however and became a bit easier to grasp.

The snap tool, as well as basic concepts such as using move and scale were also covered. At this point they are easy to understand within 3DsMax but it is still a little unnerving to see objects scale and move in an infinite virtual space with its high sensitivities and strange conventions.

There was also use of the snap tool which helps to connect and move objects, it has become obvious very quickly that this could not be done by eye and so the tool is important, I have confusion still on its application which I will try to resolve quickly.

Now in the modelling stage, I have started with a basic box and from there changed the dimensions to create the appropriate size. I am modelling only the base of the treasure chest at this point in time and will model the lid after the base is completed.

Before altering the basic box I have made I convert to editable poly which has been stressed by both my lecturer and in the tutorial videos. I have also learnt that while modelling I should aim to make models as contiguous (hollow) as possible.

At this point in time I feel I am partially comfortable with basic navigation such as w for move, e for rotate, and r for scale. We have been instructed to learn these short cuts early and they have already started to help.

 

pirate-treasure-chest-toybox-bing-images
figure 1. Treasure Chest Box. (2016)

 

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figure 2. Basic Box for model. Wyld, A. (2016)

 

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figure 3. Basic Box for model step two. Wyld, A. (2016)

 

 

References

 

figure 1. Toy Treasure Box. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://photo.foter.com/photos/pi/339/pirate-treasure-chest-toybox-bing-images.jpg

figure 2. Wyld, A. Basic Box for Model. Production Pipeline. (2016)

 figure 3. Wyld, A. Basic Box for Model step two. Production Pipeline. (2016)

AutoDesk Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 3

This week I have found that I can see how some of the concepts covered until this point can come together in the production process.

After the pre-production and modelling phases of the pipeline, UV mapping is necessary to allow an object to correctly position or map a texture to the 3D model that has been created (Auto Desk Inc, 2016).

While these concepts have been more firmly planted in my mind over the few weeks, in practice I am still constructing my treasure chest model which is almost ready for UV mapping. I have understood and I am now comfortable with most of the techniques I have used to  model my asset to this point. I have repeatedly used inset, extrude and connect to model however the snap tool is a tool I find to be unpredictable and difficult to use.

While snapping primitives in the first test model we made in class I can see how it works in principle. However when the model was no longer just a simple primitive snapping to another primitive, for example edge to edge its harder to predict how the snap tool will affect the model. navigation is becoming a bit more comfortable in 3Ds max, however everything still seems very foreign.

The symmetrical method for modelling has continued in class and I find that I can grasp why it is used and also the benefits but I am continuing with the method shown in the tutorial videos still as I am finding it easier to grasp what I am modelling as a 3D object. I plan to do this for this treasure chest to first become familiar with how the specific tools and methods of creating forms in 3Ds work.

The snap tool continues to be a struggle for me. It is use with the grid and use with symmetrical modelling that I find hard and I will try to improve my practical understanding of the snap tool.

My model is at the stage that I have begun to create the lid of my treasure chest, again I repeat the process with the base and start with a basic box. As I understand it, it is important to create the lid with dimensions that almost exactly match the base. There is a small amount of leeway because of alterations that will be made to the lid as well as the fact the lid will sit on top of the chest and therefore can be slightly larger as it may be in real life. After creating the box I have added extrusions at the side which will become the metal straps on the top of my lid. I have intentionally made this quite large so it will become a prominent feature of the model.

The model is at a point that still requires changes to the base. The panels are not quite right and I would like to alter how they look. I have been trying to keep in mind suitability of style and will alter the treasure chest to have a cartoon feel, I aim to achieve this by exaggerating some of the treasure chests dimensions.

Screenshot (19)
figure 1. Treasure chest model with lid. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (22)
figure 2. Treasure chest model with lid step two. (Wyld, 2016).

 

References

figure 1. Treasure chest model with lid. (Wyld,2016). Production Pipeline.

 

Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 4

Continuing from the basic form of the treasure chest lid, I currently have a curve to the top. The basic lid shape needs to be altered however. I have been having trouble with the curve shape. It is quite blocky and not a suitable curve. I have inserted several more edges, the spacing using pinch segments and slide, it has taken several attempts.

I have altered the chest base so the panels slope in the way. I played around with a few things until I realised that I could use the scale tool and extrude in the way towards the inside of my model. After a few adjustments of how much to inset the panels I have the look I want that is congruent with the desired cartoon aesthetic.

I have realised that I do not have a lock on the treasure chest and extruded one from the front of the lid, I can then scale down the bottom to create a narrowing to the bottom of the lock. The lock size has been exaggerated the same way the metal straps have been as well as the base panels.

The curve of the lid has then been fixed. It has taken a while to get used to using the move tool to edit edges, pulling them up to create a smooth curve. At first I did not understand why the curve on the lid appeared boxy but after realising I needed more edges the curve is correct. I have also repeated the process on the underside of the lid. The inside curve to the lid is much smaller and was easier to create after the exterior curve. An issue I have had in general is the edges on the model and deletion. When fine tuning the model odd extra lines appeared that I did not recognise, during class I have learnt that sometimes extra edges form because a part of the model has been collapsed onto an edge, leaving several lines overlapping. In 3DsMax  using backspace deletes the edge, however using control backspace also deletes the vertices. It has helped greatly to use wire frame to check if problems with the such as this have occurred.

Overall up until this point I still have had very little problems with the modelling and following with the tutorial videos (‘Axis navitas login’, n.d.) has meant I understand the methods used in this particular way to model the treasure chest.

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figure 1. Treasure Chest Model Basic Form. (Wyld, 2016).

 

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figure 2.  Treasure chest model basic form of lid. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (35).png
figure 3. Treasure chest final modelling. (wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (34).png
figure 4. Treasure chest  final modelling of lid. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (38).png
figure 5. Treasure Chest final modelling of lock. (Wyld, 2016).

 

References

figure 1. Treasure Chest Model Basic Form. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 2.  Treasure chest model basic form of lid. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 3. Treasure chest final modelling. (wyld, 2016).

figure 4. Treasure chest  final modelling of lid. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 5. Treasure Chest final modelling of lock. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Autodesk Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

Login. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from https://moodle-sae-au.axis.navitas.com/course/view.php?id=328&section=8

 

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 5

This week I am finishing the very minute changes to my model and moving on to UV mapping (Autodesk Inc, 2016). During class we have covered the concepts of UV mapping and are moving on to various techniques to achieve the suitable UV mapping. We have been shown how the UV mapping should and shouldn’t appear on the model. Stretching is an indicator there is something wrong, unusual scaling and warping of parts of the texture are issues that occur often near the beginning of the UV mapping process when it is first applied to the model.

The first step is to use the unwrap UVW, which then appears in the modifier list. Open UV editor is now an option under the modify tab.

To prepare for the texture which will be used later in the production process a temporary texture is used. The shortcut key m, brings up the material editor. From here using the standard texture option I have connected a bitmap to the diffuse option under my standard material. When these are linked I can instruct 3Ds to show this chosen texture on my model in the view port. I have used a checker pattern, following the tutorial example (‘Axis navitas login’, n.d.), which is in Targa format. This Targa file I now understand acts as my bitmap in the material editor and is a suitable image file format for this purpose.

The UVW editor is essentially for editing where the flat shapes that comprise the model sit in the texture space. In class it has been covered that UVW is the renamed x, y and z axis labels for texture mapping. This is apparently to prevent confusion as there is already 3 dimensional axis within the program model space.

It is from the UVW editor that I have been using the explode and relax tool on individual elements to get rid of the strange warping. At first I did not understand way the break and relax tool as applications, however I now imagine the concept as breaking apart the edges of the faces that are joined and using the relax tool, pushing these edges away from each other.

I have used a checker pattern as used in the tutorials I am following. There is distinctive warping in patches and a lot of scaling problems. There are faces on the model that did not seem to have the checker pattern at all but I have realised that it is just extreme variances in the scaling.

Although I have been supplementing my class and tutorial viewing with other sources I have started to deviate away from using the tutorial videos more as I have been introduced to tools which may fix my warping problems more efficiently. I will begin to experiment with this as the method I am currently using has proven to be slightly inefficient.

Screenshot (39)
figure 1. Treasure chest model with UV warping. (Wyld, 2016).

 

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figure 2. Treasure chest model with uv warping close-up. (Wyld,2016)

References

figure 1. Treasure chest model with UV warping. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 2. Treasure chest model with uv warping close-up. (Wyld,2016)

 

Autodesk Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

Login. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from https://moodle-sae-au.axis.navitas.com/course/view.php?id=328&section=8

 

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 7

I have begun texturing by opening the UV renders in Photoshop (Álvarez, 2016). The renders have been saved as a Targa. After opening this file it must be renamed, which also unlocks and changes the Targa to a regular layer in Photoshop. The renders are then inverted from their black and green using ctrl+i, this switches the renders to purple outline with a white background.

During class as well as individual research I have been learning more about how to use the mask tool. While I now understand how to use this, I have decided as I am already mid-way in the texturing process to leave my layers unmasked. I understand that masking is very useful as instead of deleting it is possible to add or subtract how much of a layer is visible.

My current layering system consists of wood layers and metal, which are in respective folders. I have started with a photo texture of fine wood grain taken from an online resource.

The first task with this photo has been to ensure that the size is correct and matches the overall size of my UV render file, with 2048×2048 being the target size. using the image size options in Photoshop, resolution is now 300 pixels per inch and the dimensions 2048 x 2048.

The photo that I have started with is not large enough to preserve its sharpness with its default size. I have used offset and define pattern to tile the photo, I have then used several techniques to create a seamless texture which can be repeated. This involved utilising the heal and the clone tool. I have also copied and re-pasted areas of the photo. Overall my wood texture is devoid of obvious seams. The resulting texture is also fairly monotonous and does not have any unique knots or shapes in the grain.

The process taken to arrive at this point has required assistance to ensure I have altered image size correctly and that the texture is working decently in general.

Despite creation of a seamless texture, I do not feel that the texture will be appropriate for the treasure chest model. I have been experimenting with effects such as adding dust and dirt, scratches and altering the colour.

After another class, I have learnt further techniques for texturing my model and I feel that I will start over with a different approach.

I have decided that I will create the texture from scratch in Photoshop. I believe that this will be the appropriate approach for my treasure chest as I can determine the aesthetic of the grain of the wood. I also think that creating a texture from scratch will result in a texture which is congruent with the cartoon style I am aiming for.

I have begun with a solid colour base, where I have chosen the exact wood colour that would be suitable, a chocolate brown.

Texturing has so far presented a few difficult hurdles. Trial and error has been a large part of this process and whilst I have abandoned my first attempt I feel that I can navigate Photoshop with a little more ease.

WoodFine0011_S
figure 1. Wood fine texture. (2016, 2005).

 

treasure chest texturing 006
figure 2. Treasure chest model texture. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (56).png
figure 3. Treasure chest model with texture. (Wyld, 2016).

 

 References

Álvarez, R. (2016, March 22). Create anything you can imagine. Anywhere you are. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.adobe.com/au/products/photoshop.html

 

figure 1. Wood fine texture. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://photo.foter.com/photos/pi/339/pirate-treasure-chest-toybox-bing-images.jpg. (2016, 2005).

figure 2. Treasure chest model texture. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 3. Treasure chest model with texture. (Wyld, 2016).

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 6

During class I have discovered that it would be far more practical to utilise a different grid pattern on my model (Autodesk Inc, 2016). This is because it would be suitable as we will need to view direction.

We have been supplied with a generic grid pattern that is commonly used. The specific grid supplied uses colours and numbers to display how the texture will wrap. It helps to indicate what direction parts of the texture are facing and relation of different areas of the texture to each other. It shows direction because of the way numbers appear. Their orientation and which way they are facing makes spotting issues a lot easier.

I have areas which I have managed to fix simply because I can now see the nature of a warping issue. After being introduced to several tools, mostly in the arrange elements section of the UV editor, I have experimented. As I had been told far before I had started UV mapping, a lot of the process is tweaking and moving and adjusting until the mapping is correct. I have learnt in class also that apart from wrong direction I must bear in mind mirroring on the two symmetrical sides of the treasure chest model.

I have been using the rotate tool to arrange the UVs to face the correct direction. I have also managed to use the break and relax tool along with the pack tools to get the right option. The padding has then been reduced, this is to ensure that the gaps between uvs are minimal. This has been changed from 0.2 to 0.01. rescale has been selected and I have also learnt that when necessary to weld pieces together, the threshold is the amount of space that the weld tool will span to, for example if set to 0.01, this very small gap is the range that any other piece must be within to be successfully welded.

I have also used the shrink and grow selection to fit my UV within the required space. All pieces must within this checkered square, with the entire texture being represented by this square.

Sometimes at this process stitching pieces together is necessary for easy location of parts of the model during the texturing phase. It is not always necessary but sometimes makes reading the flattened 2D version of a model easier.

It is at this point I have rendered my UVs. I have been instructed however to re-render my UVs as half of my model, to ensure a higher level of efficiency when texturing.

This re-render was done with assistance and involved cutting my model in half, ensuring that the centre of the cut line was exactly on the 0,0 point of the grid in model space. After rendering my UVs, the two halves were then reattached with the attach button. It is important to note that it is at this point that extra edges have to be eliminated, which can be checked by toggling wire frame (F3) and must be deleted properly, not with backspace.

It has been the UV mapping which up until this point in the process has been the hardest to understand. Despite understanding enough to accomplish UV renders, I feel that the created UVs have been done so tentatively and with less precision than ideal. It is at this point I can move onto the next step in the production process as my renders are suitable and have been green lit for texturing.

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figure 1. Treasure chest model UV mapping completion lid. (Wyld,2016).

 

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figure 2.  Treasure chest model UV mapping completion model. (Wyld, 2016).
Screenshot (42)
figure 3. UV editor. (Wyld,2016).

 

Screenshot (43)
figure 4. Rendering UV template. (Wyld, 2016).

 

 

 References

figure 1. Treasure chest model UV mapping completion lid.Production pipeline. (Wyld,2016).

figure 2.  Treasure chest model UV mapping completion model. Production pipeline. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 3. UV editor. Production pipeline. (Wyld,2016).

figure 4. Rendering UV template. Production pipeline. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

 

 

Pirate Treasure Chest Progress 8

The design decision has been made to create a dark oak texture, one which mimics a straight wood grain that does not have knots or rings. Using a brush tool (Álvarez, 2016), I have drawn in the lines of the grain over the base. The gradient tool allows an addition of highlights, while a soft brush has been used to add shadow.

Layer effects which I have been shown by a classmate has helped to add depth to the wood grain whilst maintaining the cartoon aesthetic. The gradient tool has been further utilised to create shine on the metal components of the treasure chest.

Taking a cue from the tutorial videos (‘Axis navitas login’, n.d) the edge lines of the treasure chest model have been painted over to emphasize its cartoonish form.

While texturing in Photoshop I find that the hardest part has been using the layering system. This also ties in with using the masking which has only just clicked for me as a concept.

Something which has been a struggle to learn within the layering system is the order. Instances of brush strokes or layers disappearing has proven confusing, only recently the visibility and and layer order are becoming more natural to use. There was also an instance where I had changed the colour of the brush tool to closely match the wood base, with realisation taking several minutes, at first mistaking this to be the result of painting on the wrong layer.

After much trial and error with the possibilities within Photoshop, the finishing touches to the highlights and shadow, as well as the wood grain have been made. The process of animation the next step in the production process.

This step involved the usage of using the animation system within 3Ds Max (Autodesk Inc, 2016) and works on the basis of placing set keys at the required intervals. I have found this tricky at first, at one point losing my placed set keys. selecting objects that have set keys attached to them allows them to reappear on the animation timeline. Learning to move the treasure chest around in the correction positions as well as creating and utilising object controllers has been the main learning curve during the animation process. Now that i understand this i have tweaked a few things within the scene.

The very last aspect has been to render the scene and this has required changing of settings for output and resolution, also to be considered are the frame range and frame rate. Several error codes have popped up before

Screenshot (55)
figure 1. Treasure chest model final texture. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Screenshot (54).png
figure 2. Treasure chest model in scene before render. (Wyld, 2016).

 

 References

figure 1. Treasure chest model final texture. Production pipeline. (Wyld, 2016).

figure 2. Treasure chest model in scene before render. Production pipeline. (Wyld, 2016).

 

Autodesk Inc, A. (2016). 3d Modelling & rendering software. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.autodesk.com.au/products/3ds-max/overview

Login. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from https://moodle-sae-au.axis.navitas.com/course/view.php?id=328&section=8

Álvarez, R. (2016, March 22). Create anything you can imagine. Anywhere you are. Retrieved April 7, 2016, from http://www.adobe.com/au/products/photoshop.html